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U.s. 10, America 9, China 5, Canada 4, New York 3, India 3, Washington 3, Syria 3, Us 3, United States 2, Union Bank 2, Assad 2, Newman 2, Stowe 2, Honolulu 2, Afghanistan 2, Iraq 2, Vermont 2, The East China Sea 2, Iran 2,
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  WETA    BBC World News America    News/Business.  
   U.S.-targeted nightly newscast.  

    September 25, 2012
    6:00 - 6:30pm EDT  

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>> this is "bbc world news." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering
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specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." in >> this is abc world news america, reporting from washington, i am laura trevelyan. president obama condemned the video that prompted protest while the defending america's right to free speech. >> there is no speech that justifies mindless violence. there are no words to accuse the killing of innocents. -- to excuse the killing of
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innocents. >> and move over>mitt romney and barack obama, a comedy duo. what do they want americans to vote for? welcome to our viewers on pbs home america and also around the globe. this comes just days after violent protests broke out across the muslim world over and american maid video. it also calls for the end of assad's government in syria and would do all it could. jeremy has more.
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>> in the motorcade pulled into the united nations headquarters as the secretary general was sounding the alarm. he said it was a time of turmoil, transition, and transformation. for americans right now, that means protests about the anti- muslim film produced in this country. three of his colleagues were killed and one of the protests. the president told the general assembly that no words could excuse the killing of innocents. >> more broadly, it also speaks to the need for all of us to honestly address tensions between the west in the world bettas moving towards democracy. let me be clear. as we can solve every problem in the world, the united states has not and will not dictate the outcome of a democratic transitions. >> with strong feeling and a new era of democracy, it's not as if
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they can. the protests have made the middle east and issue only six weeks away. with accusations that president obama approach has been weak. president obama could still call upon the egyptian president and other authoritarian arab springs. the american president -- he is the first arab in a crisis. now they needed to address both and a new friend to put in it. in his speech, he defended his response to the arab uprising and looking past the elections to a nuclear installations, they warn that time is running out. >> it is not a talent that can be contained. it will threaten the elimination of israel and the stability of the global economy. it also triggers a nuclear arms race in the region.
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that is why a coalition of countries is holding government accountable. that is what the united states must do what we must do to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> iran also says it doesn't want a nuclear weapon. the americans and their western allies are still struggling to find a way to deal with the changes in the middle east. the truth is, it will probably never again be as straightforward as it was when they had their old authoritarian friends to rely on. >> i spoke to timothy, a former u.s. ambassador for india under the obama administration. it is a very robust defense of america's constitutional rights. how do you think it goes across
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the muslim world in the wake of this controversial one? >> he tried to do three things and i thought he was very effective. first, he talked about a very strong case for u.s. leadership in the world. he condemned the violence and also made the case for free speech and what that means in the world. secondly, he talked about the advancement of democracy. how that is founded on principles. and thirdly, i thought he talked very effectively to a domestic audience, a litany of achievements that he has obtained in his foreign policy, thereby strengthening his record there. contrasting what governor romney might do or what he might not do. >> as a candidate in the days of the berlin speech, he talked about the need to tear down the
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wall between christians and jews and muslims. but that was as high as ever. >> as ambassador to india for a few years, you see a lot of good things in the world. the ambassador was killed and i lived in india for several years. and to see jews and christians and muslims and hindus and everybody living together rather peacefully, and getting along and democracy, those are good stories. we can talk about those things, but what of the president did was there were a few people that attacked the consulate in libya. that does not represent the muslim world. those people that condemned the extremism have to forcefully
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speak out, whether it is denying the holocaust or depicting in a negative way jesus christ. all of that has to be condemned. gosh there were strong words, they must not belong to a dictator that massacres his people. >> is a very difficult situation and the president briefly talked about trying to support those that overthrow assad. it's a long speech to a big crowd, also to the domestic audience. he tried to talk about iran and the limitations on their time. not time to address everything. >> he said the time for diplomacy was not unlimited. >> i think it means what he has been saying that he will tighten
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sanctions and work with the world community to put the toughest sanctions in place to try to get new behavior. all options are on the table and they don't have unlimited time to do what they have been doing. >> the un secretary general use his speech to announce the action over syria. he called a regional calamity with global ramifications. there are clashes virtually every day, but getting the full story is proving a challenge. they have this report from inside syria. >> of the ruins of war. the government says it wants a journalist to show the true picture. some of it can't be hidden. the destruction sets along a main highway.
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they pounded the area last month after a armed opposition moved in. when we see new attacks, we see the smoke rising every day now. the big question is, what is happening on the ground. we're not being allowed to go inside the neighborhoods to see for ourselves. >> a northern suburb of visited on a recent trend. -- main mosque. we get off to a good start. >> one man says it is fine. and the soldier isn't so sure. >> this daily can't go any further but we can talk to people right here. watch the men in the striped shirt. he has put down his got and
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raced ahead of us. the time i read the shopkeeper, he has filled a bag of vendettas. posing as a customer. >> there is no chance of this shopkeeper can speak freely. you can't silence everyone? they, away from the camera, a young voice speaks out. they came yesterday and opened fire, he said. we are really scared and we're begging them to stop. i asked the government of of the indiscriminate bombing of civilian areas. >> many of these areas have fled because terrorists have attacked them. they're using them as bases,
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clinics, and storage for their bases. >> we asked to see these areas for ourselves. why don't they want the world to see what is happening? >> we fear for you and we don't have a problem for you to see it with our own eyes, but the main priority is to protect you. >> sometimes the violence comes to you. this is seconds after a small blast outside the hotel. we caught this on camera, but there is so much more that we don't see. >> turkish media say seven members of the security forces have been killed in an explosion in the eastern city. the blast was a military vehicle in the district of the city. fighting between rebels and turkish forces have escalated in
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recent months. she wants raised concerns that the government about the radical muslim cleric. he is due to be extradited and for the u.s. on terrorism charges. police have charged protesters attending a rally. the protests, head of the budget announcement expected to contain proposals for further cuts. u.s. ground strikes in northwest pakistan are frequently injuring not only civilians, but there rescue workers. that is where follow-up strike started the location does just been hit. a new report from stanford, the actual targets were taliban and al qaeda militants, most of them low-level operatives.
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>> it reaches damning conclusions about the cia drone program. they say it is counterproductive and damaging, killing very few senior leaders and terrorizing an entire community in the process. senior militants account for an estimated 2% of drone victims, but they paint a picture of the entire community living in paralyzing fear, men, women and children looking at the skies overhead, wondering when death is going to come raining down. many people are too afraid to attend the gatherings. they say some parents are afraid to send their children to school or the children are too traumatized to go. one worker compared the level of fear with the fear in new york after 9/11.
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it also highlights the risk to rescue workers. that means those that go to give assistance after a strike can be killed themselves. the majority of those killed are believed to be suspected militants, but independent researchers say that several hundred civilians are also counted among the dead. officials said the drones are surgically precise. they say that claim is false but either way, the administration is expected to continue using the weapons here and elsewhere. >> trauma on the high seas over a group of uninhabited islands in the east china sea. of china and the pan dispute sovereignty of the island, but taiwan's enter the fray. >> sailing off to waters come more than 50 taiwanese fishing
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boats leave airports. it is the latest confrontation in the east china sea. the u.s. is one that seems like this could lead to conflict. the competing territory by beijing and tokyo is making the region nervous. china opposed the main news bulletin, another symbol of the rising power. dozens of operational planes will be used for training. but it is a sign of the growing military ambitions. as china becomes more powerful, the nationalism as alarming the neighbors. that triggered a wave of violent anti-japanese protests. japanese shops and businesses were attacked.
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the they appear to want to cool the tensions. the deputy foreign ministers for the first time since this dispute. neither side wants to back down. >> china will never tolerate any unilateral actions the harm territorial sovereignty. they use concrete actions to amend its errors. >> for a once in a decade leadership change, the leaders can't afford to lose greece. it is popular with the chinese public, but that means that there is little room for compromise. >> still to come on tonight's program, helping american soldiers overcome the very real scars of war.
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thou, sometimes even nature and needs a helping hand. the australian scientists are trying to artificially inseminate crocodiles. our correspondent reports from sydney. >> it is what you might call a delicate task. extracting out of a fully grown and uncooperative crocodile. scientists are removing this even from 10 mails to artificially impregnated her around 40 females. if they left it to nature, they often attack females and killing them while damaging their valuable skins. >> we will change the nature of this time. the way, we can have a brilliant girls. we will simply inseminate them every year, and that as that. >> it has taken them a year to
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work out the income that anatomy of a crocodile and to develop a safe technique for removing the seamen. it is described as a kind of tickling process. >> it is a scam production industry and a lot of the skins are going out. things like that. there are plenty of some types of crocodiles, others are on the endangered list. there is also a conservation project. >> there is a bit of trouble out there as far as the crocodile world is concerned. we think this type of technology will have an application. >> it could be a few months of the end of the females are pregnant, this unique attempt at reptilian reproduction doesn't end in tears of a different variety.
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>> to the wars in iraq and afghanistan have dramatically increased the number of troops or about suffering from post- traumatic stress disorder. here in the u.s., 300,000 troops are estimated to be affected. the military is planning millions to help veterans cut when they return home. we visited the u.s. military technology lab in washington state and since this report. >> the human hamster ball and aren't any big. it is virtual reality technology on trial by the u.s. military to help treat veterans for posttraumatic stress. in this case, recreating a foot patrol in iraq or sitting at the wheel of an armored car when a roadside bomb goes off. they are a frequent cause of
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trauma, recreating what happens in the way it happens, reliving events as realistically as possible, one way of getting over a traumatic event. >> it may be appealing to service members and give us the opportunity to treat some that otherwise would not come in. and it may result of better treatment outcome. >> more computer came than sitting on a couch, but research suggests it is even more effective. the idea is to submerge them in a recreation of what happened to them. he gives you a sense of being behind the wheel of a humvee, a smell was generated to make you feel like you are in iraq and when a bomb goes off, you feel it in the wheel editor of your body. >> agree then deeply using your diaphragm. >> smart fella applications
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designed to attract moves adult patients coat between sessions. a bomb disposal engineer in afghanistan, he is trying something new. >> is a pocket therapist. these applications are when you're sitting at home or out and about and you have access to do this. nobody will know what you're doing. >> of the future will go one step further. what during devices to record brain waves, heart rate, and skin temperature. >> will look at stress, a difficult thing to manage and identified. to be able to look at my advice and understand i am having an attack. a doctor that understands all of these things might be able to say, here is something we need to look at. >> each new technology makes it more accessible and more
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convenient for more people. washington state. >> new ways of helping america's veterans. the 42 days before the presidential election in the u.s.. polls show it is a tight race, but to comedians are trying to convince americans to choose a real outsider for the job. canada. they have written a book called america, but better. they argue that canada leads the u.s. when it comes to quality of health care and education. we join them on one of their campaign stops. >> when you think of canada running for president? >> i am voting for obama. >> who would you choose next?
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maybe canada? just as america little time to kick back for a while. >> america but better, the as a video that would viral. >> it is canada, the country you pretend to be when you're traveling. >> is not a bad idea, of the canadian people running for president. dodge and don't go yet. i just save the man. you're welcome, america. you are welcome, france as well. >> who better to lead america that the country already leading america in so many ways? that is just what our hippies have accomplished. >> we like to tackle the big issues. or like to point to hypocrisies. we have a list of campaign
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promises. >> will provide health care taught hockey players first. free dental. >> sweetly. we will legalize it, tax is, and by american maps from china. >> the national program, a special thanks. >> most of the followers are based in the states. some are sick of the political situation, and some of them appreciate there is a group there to laugh. >> people don't trust the media or politics anymore. the satire is basically speaking humor to power. we're going right through the end. i think the american people will shake their heads and say, that
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is our best choice. >> canada for president. >> the unique campaign brings today's show to a close. you can find out they thought our web site. and from all of us here at world news america, thank you for watching and we will see you tomorrow. >> funding of this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank.
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>> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to nurture new ventures adult provide capital for key, strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailor solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> bbc world news was presented by
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